Research

Object Detection/Recognition

In computer vision is the task of finding and identifying objects in an image or video sequence. Humans recognize a multitude of objects in images with little effort, despite the fact that the image of the objects may vary somewhat in different view points, in many different sizes / scale or even when they are translated or rotated. Objects can even be recognized when they are partially obstructed from view. This task is still a challenge for computer vision systems. Many approaches to the task have been implemented over multiple decades. 

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Activity/Event Detection

The rapid growth in size of storage devices allows us to store hours, days or even months of video data. Watching through and analyzing videos of such length is no longer feasible. In order to summarize or index videos (for search purposes) we need to develop algorithms which detect and classify events happening in the video without human supervision. To identify and describe various types of events we seek important features and ways of extracting/learning them from the video data.

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Affective Computing

Affective computing is the study and development of systems and devices that can recognize, interpret, process, and simulate human affects. It is an interdisciplinary field spanning computer sciencepsychology, and cognitive science. While the origins of the field may be traced as far back as to early philosophical enquiries into emotion,the more modern branch of computer science originated with Rosalind Picard‘s 1995 paper on affective computing. A motivation for the research is the ability to simulate empathy. The machine should interpret the emotional state of humans and adapt its behaviour to them, giving an appropriate response for those emotions.

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Social Computing

Social computing is an area of computer science that is concerned with the intersection of social behavior and computational systems. It has become an important concept for use in business. It is used in two ways as detailed below.
In the weaker sense of the term, social computing involves supporting any sort of social behavior in or through computational systems. It is based on creating or recreating social conventions and social contexts through the use of software and technology. Thus, blogsemailinstant messagingsocial network serviceswikis,social bookmarking and other instances of what is often called social software illustrate ideas from social computing, but also other kinds of software applications where people interact socially.

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